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Cost−Benefit Analysis Simulation of a Hospital-Based Violence Intervention Program

  • Jonathan Purtle
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, Department of Health Management and Policy, Drexel University School of Public Health, 3215 Market Street, Philadelphia PA 19104
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Management and Policy, Drexel University School of Public Health and Department of Emergency Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Linda J. Rich
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Management and Policy, Drexel University School of Public Health and Department of Emergency Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Sandra L. Bloom
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Management and Policy, Drexel University School of Public Health and Department of Emergency Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • John A. Rich
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Management and Policy, Drexel University School of Public Health and Department of Emergency Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Theodore J. Corbin
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Management and Policy, Drexel University School of Public Health and Department of Emergency Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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Published:November 06, 2014DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2014.08.030

      Background

      Violent injury is a major cause of disability, premature mortality, and health disparities worldwide. Hospital-based violence intervention programs (HVIPs) show promise in preventing violent injury. Little is known, however, about how the impact of HVIPs may translate into monetary figures.

      Purpose

      To conduct a cost−benefit analysis simulation to estimate the savings an HVIP might produce in healthcare, criminal justice, and lost productivity costs over 5 years in a hypothetical population of 180 violently injured patients, 90 of whom received HVIP intervention and 90 of whom did not.

      Methods

      Primary data from 2012, analyzed in 2013, on annual HVIP costs/number of clients served and secondary data sources were used to estimate the cost, number, and type of violent reinjury incidents (fatal/nonfatal, resulting in hospitalization/not resulting in hospitalization) and violent perpetration incidents (aggravated assault/homicide) that this population might experience over 5 years. Four different models were constructed and three different estimates of HVIP effect size (20%, 25%, and 30%) were used to calculate a range of estimates for HVIP net savings and cost−benefit ratios from different payer perspectives. All benefits were discounted at 5% to adjust for their net present value.

      Results

      Estimates of HVIP cost savings at the base effect estimate of 25% ranged from $82,765 (narrowest model) to $4,055,873 (broadest model).

      Conclusions

      HVIPs are likely to produce cost savings. This study provides a systematic framework for the economic evaluation of HVIPs and estimates of HVIP cost savings and cost−benefit ratios that may be useful in informing public policy decisions.
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