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The Quest for Effective HIV-Prevention Interventions for Latino Gay Men

  • Jesus Ramirez-Valles
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Jesus Ramirez-Valles, PhD, MPH, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor Street, SPH-PI, Chicago IL 60612-4394.
    Affiliations
    School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
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      Do we have effective HIV-prevention interventions for Latino gay men? Where are they? What do they look like? These are some of the major questions raised by the article in this supplement to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
      Task Force on Community Prevention Services
      The effectiveness of individual-, group-, and community-level HIV behavioral risk-reduction interventions for adult men who have sex with men: a systematic review.
      The purpose of this article, and the recommendations derived from it, is to synthesize the most effective behavioral interventions to prevent HIV infection among adult gay men and men who have sex with men (MSM).
      Although the term “men who have sex with men” is the one used in the report, I will use the term gay men. The former is used to denote a behavior presumably free of social meaning. Gay man denotes a socially constructed identity and, as such, speaks to the social and political context of the AIDS epidemic. Yet, the gay man identity does not apply to all men, regardless of their ethnicity, who are attracted to other men or have homosexual desires.
      • Young I.M.
      • Meyer I.H.
      The trouble with “MSM and WSW”: erasure of the sexual-minority person in public health discourse.
      The report is a critical contribution to the field, as it covers over 20 years of prevention research around the globe. Its findings promise to inform our future practice, funding, and research. Yet, as the authors note and as the reader will realize, the evidence of effective approaches among ethnic minorities, Latino gay men in particular, is sparse, at best.
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