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An Urgent Call to Action in Support of Injury Control Research Centers

      Injury, including unintentional injury and violence, is the third-leading cause of death in the U.S., disproportionately affecting lower-income and minority populations.
      • Wong M.D.
      • Shapiro M.F.
      • Boscardin W.F.
      • Ettner S.L.
      Contribution of major diseases to disparities in mortality.
      • Cubbin C.
      • LeClere F.B.
      • Smith G.S.
      Socioeconomic status and the occurrence of fatal and nonfatal injury in the U.S..
      Lifetime costs for U.S. injuries occurring in 1 year alone (2000) totaled $406 billion,
      • Finkelstein E.A.
      • Corso P.S.
      • Miller T.R.
      The incidence and economic burden of injuries in the U.S..
      with medical expenditures in just 1 year (2006) of $68.1 billion, exceeded only by heart disease expenditures at $78 billion. Globally, injury is responsible for 9.8% of the world's recorded mortality annually, killing an estimated 5 million people, as many deaths as malaria, TB, and HIV combined.
      • Gosselin R.A.
      • Spiegel D.A.
      • Coughlin R.
      • Zirkle L.W.
      Injuries: the neglected burden in developing countries.
      This burden persists despite evidence that support for injury research and its translation into effective policies and programs can result in injury reduction and improved health outcomes.
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        Injuries: the neglected burden in developing countries.
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