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The Cost of Alcohol and Its Corresponding Taxes in the U.S.

A Massive Public Subsidy of Excessive Drinking and Alcohol Industries
      In an invaluable update using a standard cost-of-illness approach, Bouchery et al.
      • Bouchery E.
      • Harwood H.
      • Sacks J.
      • Simon C.J.
      • Brewer R.D.
      Economic costs of excessive alcohol consumption in the U.S., 2006.
      estimated the financial impact of excessive alcohol consumption in the U.S. for 2006, the most recent year for which data were available. The results ($223.5 billion or $746 per capita that year) are staggering and exceed the costs of the other leading preventable causes of death in the U.S., including cigarette smoking and physical inactivity. This is partly because excessive alcohol consumption involves many second-hand or external costs (i.e., costs that are incurred by those other than the consumers, sellers, or producers of alcohol) and because many alcohol-related outcomes begin at relatively young ages, which results in large future productivity losses and prolonged or recurrent expenditures related to health care and the criminal justice system.
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      References

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