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Advancing the Science of Sedentary Behavior Measurement

      Until recently, the health risks associated with a sedentary lifestyle were thought to be a result of insufficient moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA), leading many to inaccurately assume that sedentary behavior and MVPA were opposite ends of the same continuum.
      DHHS
      Physical activity and health: a report of the Surgeon General.
      This assumption was first challenged by Owen and colleagues
      • Owen N.
      • Leslie E.
      • Salmon J.
      • Fotheringham M.J.
      Environmental determinants of physical activity and sedentary behaviour.
      who reported that the determinants of sedentary behavior and physical activity might be distinct. Over the past 10 years, more than 350 articles have been published that have measured or conceptualized sedentary behavior as a concept distinct from physical activity, and there is now widespread conceptual and empirical support that the two exert independent and interdependent influences on health.
      • Biddle S.J.
      Sedentary behavior.
      • Marshall S.J.
      • Ramirez E.
      Reducing sedentary behavior: a new paradigm for physical activity promotion.
      • Owen N.
      • Sparling P.B.
      • Healy G.N.
      • Dunstan D.W.
      • Matthews C.E.
      Sedentary behavior: emerging evidence for a new health risk.
      • Pate R.
      • O'Neill J.R.
      • Lobelo F.
      The evolving definition of “sedentary.”.
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      References

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