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The Times They (May) Be A-Changin’

Too Much Screening Is a Health Problem
  • Russell Harris
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Russell Harris, MD, MPH, Department of Medicine, Division of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 725 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill NC 27599
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, Division of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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  • Stacey Sheridan
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, Division of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    Search for articles by this author
      The appeal of screening for both the public and the medical profession has been a dominant force in prevention for the past 50 years. The general trend toward increased intensity of screening—screening more people with more sensitive tests more often—has continued seemingly unfazed by the occasional objections of some. Until now.
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