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Vaccinations Given During Pregnancy, 2002–2009

A Descriptive Study

      Background

      A number of studies have described influenza vaccination coverage during pregnancy but few publications have described rates of other vaccinations.

      Purpose

      To describe vaccination rates during pregnancy in the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD), with particular focus on vaccinations contraindicated during pregnancy.

      Methods

      Pregnancies ending in 2002 through 2009 and vaccinations administered during these pregnancies were identified in the VSD. Vaccination rates per 1000 pregnancies during the study period were calculated by vaccine type, recommendation category, pregnancy year, maternal age, and trimester. Analyses were conducted in 2012–2013.

      Results

      In the VSD, 669,695 pregnancies and 141,389 vaccinations were identified. Trivalent inactivated influenza (TIV) was the most commonly administered vaccination (174.1 doses per 1000 pregnancies) and was most often administered during the 2nd and 3rd trimesters. The most common vaccines in the “consider if indicated” category were tetanus–diphtheria (6.1 per 1000) and hepatitis B (3.7 per 1000). Contraindicated vaccination was infrequent, and the majority of these were measles–mumps–rubella (MMR) (1.2 per 1000); varicella (1.0 per 1000); and live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) (0.3 per 1000). Both “consider if indicated” and contraindicated vaccines were more frequently administered during early pregnancy.

      Conclusions

      TIV was the most commonly administered vaccine. With the exception of TIV, other vaccines were most frequently administered during early pregnancy and among younger women, suggesting that vaccination may occur when the woman and/or provider are unaware of the pregnancy. Contraindicated vaccines were infrequently administered during pregnancy; however, given that some women received contraindicated vaccines later in pregnancy, clearer recommendations and improved provider education may be needed.
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