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The Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation Trillion Calorie Pledge

Lessons from a Marketing Ploy?
      In 2010, a total of 16 major multinational food manufacturers pledged, as part of the corporate-based Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation (HWCF), to reduce their annual U.S. food and beverage calories sold by 1.5 trillion by 2015.

      Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation. Food and beverage manufacturers pledging to reduce annual calories by 1.5 trillion by 2015. 2010. healthyweightcommit.org/news/Reduce_Annual_Calories/

      Several aspects of the pledge were unusual. First, the pledge was calculated not based on only future sales after 2010, but also on a retrospective comparison to 2008. Second, the target was simply total calories, without consideration of ingredients, processing, obesogenicity, or other health effects of the products sold. Third, the true motivation was doubted, as this target could be difficult to achieve without reductions in product sales, and why would for-profit, highly competitive corporate giants such as General Mills, Kellogg, Unilever, Kraft, Nestle, PepsiCo, and Coca-Cola actively aim to reduce sales? Nonetheless, the HWCF pledge was announced with fanfare and supported by key advocacy groups including Partnership for a Healthier America and the First Lady’s Let’s Move! campaign.

      Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation. Food and beverage manufacturers pledging to reduce annual calories by 1.5 trillion by 2015. 2010. healthyweightcommit.org/news/Reduce_Annual_Calories/

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