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Delivering Patient-Centered Cancer Screening

Easier Said Than Done
  • Tanner J. Caverly
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Tanner J. Caverly, MD, MPH, Veterans Affairs Center for Clinical Management Research, 2215 Fuller Road, Ann Arbor MI 48105
    Affiliations
    Veterans Affairs Center for Clinical Management Research, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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  • Eve A. Kerr
    Affiliations
    Veterans Affairs Center for Clinical Management Research, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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  • Sameer D. Saini
    Affiliations
    Veterans Affairs Center for Clinical Management Research, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for articles by this author
Published:October 08, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2015.08.003
      Despite a consensus around the importance of both prevention and patient-centeredness, integrating these two concepts into “patient-centered prevention” will not be easy. There are times when decision making about preventive care simply cannot be patient-centered. For instance, policy decisions about whether to reduce the salt content of food products cannot be patient-centered in the way that individual decisions about screening tests can be patient-centered. There are also times when prevention should not be fully patient-centered—as when individual decisions can directly affect other people’s health (e.g., childhood immunizations). However, there are many contexts where moving toward the delivery of more patient-centered prevention is not only possible but highly desirable. One such context is cancer screening. Yet, implementing population-based cancer screening programs that are also patient-centered will require that the healthcare, public health, and policy communities overcome two key challenges.
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