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Precision Lifestyle Medicine

A New Frontier in the Science of Behavior Change and Population Health
  • Jun Ma
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Jun Ma, MD, PhD, Department of Health Policy and Administration, University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, Chicago IL 60607
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Policy and Administration, University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, Chicago, Illinois

    Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute, Palo Alto, California

    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
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  • Lisa G. Rosas
    Affiliations
    Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute, Palo Alto, California

    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
    Search for articles by this author
  • Nan Lv
    Affiliations
    Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute, Palo Alto, California
    Search for articles by this author
Published:December 01, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2015.09.035
      Despite marked strides in population health and increased life expectancy in the U.S. over the past two decades, chronic disease and disability dominate the U.S. health burden,
      • Murray C.J.
      • Atkinson C.
      • Bhalla K.
      • et al.
      The state of U.S. health, 1990-2010: burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors.
      leading to poor quality of life, high healthcare use and costs, functional impairment, psychological distress, and premature death. An estimated one in seven U.S. adults has at least two of five major chronic conditions: cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and arthritis.
      • Ford E.S.
      • Croft J.B.
      • Posner S.F.
      • Goodman R.A.
      • Giles W.H.
      Co-occurrence of leading lifestyle-related chronic conditions among adults in the United States, 2002-2009.
      These chronic conditions are highly related to unhealthy lifestyle factors, particularly smoking, physical inactivity, poor diet quality, and worsening or stagnant rates of obesity. The continuing erosion of these lifestyle factors
      • Ford E.S.
      • Li C.
      • Zhao G.
      • Pearson W.S.
      • Tsai J.
      • Greenlund K.J.
      Trends in low-risk lifestyle factors among adults in the United States: findings from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 1996-2007.
      foretells increasing incidence, prevalence, and co-occurrence of lifestyle-related chronic conditions. Together with a rapidly aging and diversifying population, chronic conditions place a heavy burden upon individuals, families, society, and healthcare systems.
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