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Mind−Body Practice and Body Weight Status in a Large Population-Based Sample of Adults

  • Géraldine M. Camilleri
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Géraldine M. Camilleri, PhD, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle, SMBH Paris 13, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, 93017 Bobigny Cedex, France
    Affiliations
    Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle, Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique, Inserm (U1153), Inra (U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93017 Bobigny, France
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  • Caroline Méjean
    Affiliations
    Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle, Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique, Inserm (U1153), Inra (U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93017 Bobigny, France
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  • France Bellisle
    Affiliations
    Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle, Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique, Inserm (U1153), Inra (U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93017 Bobigny, France
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  • Serge Hercberg
    Affiliations
    Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle, Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique, Inserm (U1153), Inra (U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93017 Bobigny, France

    Département de Santé Publique, Hôpital Avicenne, F-93017, Bobigny Cedex, France
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  • Sandrine Péneau
    Affiliations
    Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle, Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique, Inserm (U1153), Inra (U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93017 Bobigny, France
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Published:December 02, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2015.10.005

      Introduction

      In industrialized countries characterized by a high prevalence of obesity and chronic stress, mind−body practices such as yoga or meditation may facilitate body weight control. However, virtually no data are available to ascertain whether practicing mind−body techniques is associated with weight status. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the practice of mind−body techniques and weight status in a large population-based sample of adults.

      Methods

      A total of 61,704 individuals aged ≥18 years participating in the NutriNet-Santé study (2009−2014) were included in this cross-sectional analysis conducted in 2014. Data on mind−body practices were collected, as well as self-reported weight and height. The association between the practice of mind−body techniques and weight status was assessed using multiple linear and multinomial logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and dietary factors.

      Results

      After adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, regular users of mind−body techniques were less likely to be overweight (OR=0.68, 95% CI=0.63, 0.74) or obese (OR=0.55, 95% CI=0.50, 0.61) than never users. In addition, regular users had a lower BMI than never users (−3.19%, 95% CI=−3.71, −2.68).

      Conclusions

      These data provide novel information about an inverse relationship between mind−body practice and weight status. If causal links were demonstrated in further prospective studies, such practice could be fostered in obesity prevention and treatment.
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