Advertisement

Letter Regarding Maryland Alcohol Sales Tax and Sexually Transmitted Infections

      The authors read “Maryland Alcohol Sales Tax and Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Natural Experiment” by Staras et al.
      • Staras S.A.S.
      • Livingston M.D.
      • Wagenaar A.C.
      Maryland alcohol sales tax and sexually transmitted infections: a natural experiment.
      with great interest. In this paper, it is reported that the 2011 alcohol-specific sales tax increase in Maryland caused a 24% decrease in gonorrhea cases reported to the U.S. National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System, but had no effect on chlamydia. Its effects did not vary across age, race/ethnicity, or gender subgroups. Staras and colleagues refer to reductions in alcohol intake and changes in drinking patterns as possible links between the reduction in gonorrhea cases and the alcohol tax increase.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to American Journal of Preventive Medicine
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Staras S.A.S.
        • Livingston M.D.
        • Wagenaar A.C.
        Maryland alcohol sales tax and sexually transmitted infections: a natural experiment.
        Am J Prev Med. 2016; 50 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2015.09.025): e73-e80
      1. Haughwout SP, LaVallee RA, Castle IP. Apparent per capita alcohol consumption: national, state, and regional, 1977–2013. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Division of Epidemiology and Prevention Research, Alcohol Epidemiologic Data System, Surveillance Report #102. Arlington, VA: NIAA. http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/surveillance102/CONS13.htm. Published April 2015. Accessed December 21, 2015.

      Linked Article

      • Maryland Alcohol Sales Tax and Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Natural Experiment
        American Journal of Preventive MedicineVol. 50Issue 3
        • Preview
          Sexually transmitted infections are common causes of morbidity and mortality, including infertility and certain types of cancer. Alcohol tax increases may decrease sexually transmitted infection rates overall and differentially across population subgroups by decreasing alcohol consumption in general and prior to sex, thus decreasing sexual risk taking and sexually transmitted infection acquisition. This study investigated the effects of a Maryland increase in alcohol beverage sales tax on statewide gonorrhea and chlamydia rates overall and within age, gender, and race/ethnicity subpopulations.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
        Open Access
      • Authors’ Response to Letter Regarding Alcohol Sales Tax and Sexually Transmitted Infections
        American Journal of Preventive MedicineVol. 50Issue 5
        • Preview
          Middelbeek and Veuger raise the issue of the effect of alcohol tax changes on alcohol consumption in response to the authors’ article “Maryland Alcohol Sales Tax and Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Natural Experiment.”1 They point out, as the authors also do in the article, that it seems necessary for the Maryland alcohol tax increase to have influenced alcohol consumption in order for the alcohol tax increase to decrease gonorrhea rates. They suggest that a simple comparison of two data points showing a very small increase (0.03%) in Maryland per capita ethanol consumption from 2010 and 2012 (rather than a decrease in consumption) undermines the results.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF