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Demographic Trends in New HIV Diagnoses in the U.S., 2009−2013

      Introduction

      HIV testing is key to achieving the National HIV/AIDS Strategy goals. A new diagnosis metric evaluated whether testing services are reaching the remaining undiagnosed people living with HIV (PLWH), by subpopulation.

      Methods

      Centers for Disease Control and Prevention surveillance data from 2008 to 2013 were obtained for: (1) new HIV diagnoses; (2) HIV prevalence; and (3) percentage of PLWH aware of serostatus. The number of new HIV diagnoses in a given year divided by the number of undiagnosed PLWH in the previous year was determined. Trends were evaluated by calculating net percentage change in this measure from 2009 to 2013 for all new diagnoses and stratified by subpopulation. Analyses were conducted during 2015–2016.

      Results

      The proportion of all undiagnosed PLWH who achieve serostatus awareness was 26.0%, 25.9%, 26.1%, 27.7%, and 30.4% from 2009 to 2013, respectively. The absolute net change was 4.3% (5.2% for men and 0.5% for women). There was an absolute net change of 5.0%, 3.1%, and 5.5% for the black, Hispanic, and men who have sex with men communities, respectively. An absolute net change >10% was observed only for those aged 13–24 years (10.9%) and ≥65 years (17.8%), and for men who inject drugs (11.7%).

      Conclusions

      The proportion of undiagnosed PLWH who achieve serostatus awareness increased minimally from 2009 to 2013, especially for blacks, Hispanics, and men who have sex with men. Redirecting HIV testing efforts and funds to disproportionately affected communities is essential.
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