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Assessing Validity of the Fitbit Indicators for U.S. Public Health Surveillance

      Personally generated health data are increasingly used to report on population prevalence and trends, providing a new avenue for public health surveillance.
      • Chunara R.
      • Wisk L.E.
      • Weitzman E.R.
      Denominator issues for personally generated data in population health monitoring.
      Documentation of acceptable measurement properties to ensure correct interpretations should precede their use. One common source of personally generated health data comes from activity trackers, self-worn devices that provide feedback and long-term tracking on physical activity–related metrics.
      • Evenson K.R.
      • Goto M.M.
      • Furberg R.D.
      Systematic review of the validity and reliability of consumer-wearable activity trackers.
      Activity trackers are relatively unobtrusive and low cost, with 12.5% of U.S. adults reporting wearing one in 2015.
      • Omura J.D.
      • Carlson S.A.
      • Paul P.
      • et al.
      National physical activity surveillance: users of wearable activity monitors as a potential data source.
      Companies selling activity trackers already report on data acquired by their users.

      Fitbit Inc. Weathering the weather. www.fitbit.com/weathermap. Accessed April 19, 2017.

      Mohan S. The Jawbone Blog: What makes people happy? We have the data. https://jawbone.com/blog/what-makes-people-happy/. Published June 4, 2015. Accessed April 19, 2017.

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      1. Fitbit Inc. Weathering the weather. www.fitbit.com/weathermap. Accessed April 19, 2017.

      2. Mohan S. The Jawbone Blog: What makes people happy? We have the data. https://jawbone.com/blog/what-makes-people-happy/. Published June 4, 2015. Accessed April 19, 2017.

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