Advertisement

Attitudes Toward Smoke-Free Public Housing Among U.S. Adults, 2016

  • Teresa W. Wang
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Teresa W. Wang, PhD, MS, Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, MS F-79, Atlanta GA 30341
    Affiliations
    Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia

    Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Pamela R. Lemos
    Affiliations
    Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Simon McNabb
    Affiliations
    Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Brian A. King
    Affiliations
    Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
    Search for articles by this author
Published:November 16, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2017.08.026

      Introduction

      Effective February 2017, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development published a rule requiring each public housing agency to implement a smoke-free policy within 18 months. This study assessed the prevalence and determinants of favorability toward smoke-free public housing among U.S. adults.

      Methods

      Data from 2016 Summer Styles, a nationally representative web-based survey conducted among adults (N=4,203) were analyzed in 2017. Participants were asked: Do you favor or oppose prohibiting smoking in public housing, including all indoor areas of living units, common areas, and office buildings, as well as in all outdoor areas within 25 feet of buildings? Multivariate Poisson regression was used to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios of favorability (strongly or somewhat).

      Results

      Overall, 73.7% of respondents favored smoke-free public housing. Favorability was 44.3% among current cigarette smokers, 73.2% among former smokers, and 80.4% among never smokers. The adjusted likelihood of favorability was greater among non-Hispanic, non-black racial/ethnic minorities than whites, and among those in the West than the Northeast (p<0.05). Favorability was lower among adults with a high school education or less compared with those with a college degree, adults with annual household income <$15,000 than those with income ≥$60,000, multiunit housing residents than non-multiunit housing residents, current cigarette smokers than never smokers, and current non-cigarette tobacco product users than never users (p<0.05).

      Conclusions

      Most U.S. adults favor prohibiting smoking in public housing. These data can inform the implementation and sustainment of smoke-free policies to reduce the public health burden of tobacco smoking in public housing.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to American Journal of Preventive Medicine
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • U.S. DHHS
        The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General.
        U.S. DHHS, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Atlanta, GA2006 (Accessed February 1, 2017)
        • U.S. DHHS
        The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General.
        U.S. DHHS, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Atlanta, GA2014 (Accessed February 1, 2017)
        • Geller A.
        • Vaughan R.
        • Brooks D.
        The proposal for smoke-free public housing. Benefits, challenges, and opportunities for 2 million residents.
        JAMA. 2016; 315: 1105-1106https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2016.1380
        • King B.
        • Babb S.
        • Tynan M.
        • Gerzoff R.
        National and state estimates of secondhand smoke infiltration among U.S. multiunit housing residents.
        Nicotine Tob Res. 2012; 15: 1316-1321https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/nts254
        • Licht A.S.
        • King B.A.
        • Travers M.J.
        • Rivard C.
        • Hyland A.J.
        Attitudes, experiences, and acceptance of smoke-free policies among U.S. multiunit housing residents.
        Am J Public Health. 2012; 102: 1868-1871https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300717
        • Nguyen K.H.
        • Gomez Y.
        • Homa D.M.
        • King B.A.
        Tobacco use, secondhand smoke, and smoke-free home rules in multiunit housing.
        Am J Prev Med. 2016; 51: 682-692https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2016.05.009
      1. Federal Register, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Instituting Smoke-Free Public Housing. 81 FR 87430. December 5, 2016. www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/12/05/2016-28986/instituting-smoke-free-public-housing. Accessed February 6, 2017.

        • GfK
        KnowledgePanel Design Summary. 2013; (Accessed June 7, 2017)
      2. U.S. Census Bureau. Current Population Survey (CPS). www.census.gov/programs-surveys/cps.html. Accessed February 10, 2017.

        • King B.
        • Cummings M.
        • Mahoney M.
        • Juster H.
        • Hyland A.
        Multiunit housing residents’ experiences and attitudes toward smoke-free policies.
        Nicotine Tob Res. 2010; 12: 598-605https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntq053
        • Rokicki S.
        • Adamkiewicz G.
        • Fang S.C.
        • Rigotti N.A.
        • Winickoff J.P.
        • Levy D.E.
        Assessment of residents’ attitudes and satisfaction before and after implementation of a smoke-free policy in Boston multiunit housing.
        Nicotine Tob Res. 2015; 18: 1282-1289https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntv239
        • Helms V.E.
        • King B.A.
        • Ashley P.J.
        Cigarette smoking and adverse health outcomes among adults receiving federal housing assistance.
        Prev Med. 2017; 99: 171-177https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.02.001
        • Snyder K.
        • Vick J.H.
        • King B.A.
        Smoke-free multiunit housing: a review of the scientific literature.
        Tob Control. 2015; 25: 9-20https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2014-051849
        • King B.A.
        • Peck R.M.
        • Babb S.D.
        National and state cost savings associated with prohibiting smoking in subsidized and public housing in the United States.
        Prev Chronic Dis. 2014; 11: 140222https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd11.140222
      3. Questions and Answers on HUD’s Smoke Free Public Housing Proposed Rule. https://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/documents/huddoc?id=finalsmoke-freeqa.pdf. Accessed January 19, 2017.

        • Regan A.K.
        • Promoff G.
        • Dube S.R.
        • Arrazola R.
        Electronic nicotine delivery systems: adult use and awareness of the “e-cigarette” in the USA.
        Tob Control. 2013; 22: 19-23https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050044