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Opioid Prescribing by Specialty and Volume in the U.S.

  • Gery P. Guy Jr.,
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Gery P. Guy Jr., PhD, MPH, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, MS F-62, Atlanta GA 30341.
    Affiliations
    Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Kun Zhang
    Affiliations
    Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
    Search for articles by this author
Published:September 12, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.06.008
      Prescription opioids were involved in 17,087 deaths in 2016.
      • Seth P
      • Scholl L
      • Rudd RA
      • Bacon S
      Overdose deaths involving opioids, cocaine, and psychostimulants—United States, 2015–2016.
      Despite recent declines, opioid prescribing remains high and varies substantially across the country,
      • Guy G
      • Zhang K
      • Bohm M
      • et al.
      Vital signs: changes in opioid prescribing in the United States, 2006–2015.
      and by specialty.
      • Chen JH
      • Humphreys K
      • Shah NH
      • Lembke A
      Distribution of opioids by different types of Medicare prescribers.
      • Levy B
      • Paulozzi L
      • Mack KA
      • Jones CM
      Trends in opioid prescribing rates by specialty, U.S., 2007–2012.
      However, little is known about current prescribing patterns across specialty groups. This study analyzes opioid prescribing by specialty and volume using the most recent national-level data.
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