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Vaccination Practices Among Obstetrician/Gynecologists for Non-pregnant Patients

  • Sean T. O'Leary
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Sean T. O'Leary, MD, MPH, University of Colorado, Department of Pediatrics, Mail Stop F443, 13199 E. Montview Blvd., Suite 300, Aurora CO 80045.
    Affiliations
    Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado

    Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Laura E. Riley
    Affiliations
    The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, District of Columbia
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  • Megan C. Lindley
    Affiliations
    National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Mandy A. Allison
    Affiliations
    Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado

    Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Lori A. Crane
    Affiliations
    Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado

    Department of Community and Behavioral Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Laura P. Hurley
    Affiliations
    Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado

    Division of General Internal Medicine, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado
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  • Brenda L. Beaty
    Affiliations
    Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Michaela Brtnikova
    Affiliations
    Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado

    Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Margaret Collins
    Affiliations
    Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Alison P. Albert
    Affiliations
    National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Allison K. Fisher
    Affiliations
    National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Angela J. Jiles
    Affiliations
    National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Allison Kempe
    Affiliations
    Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado

    Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado
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      Introduction

      Many non-pregnant women see obstetrician-gynecologists as their sole source of medical care, yet little is known about vaccination practices of obstetrician-gynecologists for non-pregnant patients. The objectives were to assess, among a national sample of obstetrician-gynecologists, practices related to vaccine delivery in non-pregnant patients and factors associated with stocking and administering more than three different vaccines to non-pregnant patients.

      Methods

      E-mail and mail surveys were administered July–October 2015, with analyses performed during October–November 2015 and April–June 2018.

      Results

      The response rate was 73% (353/482). Human papillomavirus (92%); influenza (82%); and tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis vaccines (50%) were the vaccines most commonly assessed, with the remaining vaccines assessed by <40% of respondents. Vaccines most commonly administered by obstetrician-gynecologists to non-pregnant patients included human papillomavirus (81%); influenza (70%); and tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis (54%). The remaining vaccines were administered by <30% of obstetrician-gynecologists. Factors associated with routinely administering more than three vaccines to non-pregnant patients included working in a hospital-, public health–, or university-associated clinic (RR=1.87, 95% CI=1.35, 2.58, referent to private practice); a larger practice (more than five providers; RR=1.54, 95% CI=1.05, 2.27); perceiving fewer financial barriers (RR=0.74, 95% CI=0.57, 0.96); fewer practice-associated barriers (RR=0.71, 95% CI=0.55, 0.92); and greater patient barriers (RR=1.62, 95% CI=1.33, 1.98).

      Conclusions

      Human papillomavirus; influenza; and tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis vaccines are the only vaccines routinely assessed and administered to non-pregnant patients by most obstetrician-gynecologists. Given their role as the sole source of care for many women, obstetrician-gynecologists could make a positive impact on the vaccination status of their non-pregnant patients.
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