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Perceived Workplace Health and Safety Climates: Associations With Worker Outcomes and Productivity

  • Abigail S. Katz
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Abigail S. Katz, PhD, HealthPartners, Mail Stop 21111H, P.O. Box 1309, 8170 33rd Avenue South, Minneapolis MN 55440.
    Affiliations
    Health Promotion, HealthPartners, Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Research Division, HealthPartners, Minneapolis, Minnesota
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  • Nico P. Pronk
    Affiliations
    Health Promotion, HealthPartners, Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Research Division, HealthPartners, Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Center for Work, Health, & Well-being, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Deborah McLellan
    Affiliations
    Center for Work, Health, & Well-being, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts

    Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Jack Dennerlein
    Affiliations
    Center for Work, Health, & Well-being, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts

    Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Jeffrey N. Katz
    Affiliations
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

    Departments of Medicine and Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
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      Introduction

      This study investigates the associations between perceived workplace health and safety climates and a variety of worker and employer outcomes.

      Methods

      Self-reported data were collected from an employee health assessment offered at 3 companies (n=959) in 2014. Independent variables included 2 climate variables: perceived safety climate and perceived health and well-being climate. Logistic regression models, performed in 2016–2017, explored the associations between the 2 climate variables and 3 sets of outcomes: worker outcomes, worker health behaviors, and employer outcomes.

      Results

      Perceived workplace safety climate was positively associated with physical activity and optimal sleep. Stronger perceived workplace health and well-being and safety climates were related to less depression, higher job and life satisfaction, less back pain, and higher general health. Stronger perceived climates of workplace safety and health and well-being were associated with less productivity loss.

      Conclusions

      Conditions of work, such as perceived climate, are associated with improved worker behaviors (physical activity and sleep), worker outcomes (depression, job and life satisfaction, back pain, and general health), and employer (productivity) outcomes.
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