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Tobacco Treatment Specialist Training for Lung Cancer Screening Providers

  • Kelly L. Roughgarden
    Affiliations
    Department of Public Health Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
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  • Benjamin A. Toll
    Affiliations
    Department of Public Health Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

    Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
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  • Nichole T. Tanner
    Affiliations
    Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

    Health Equity and Rural Outreach Innovation Center (HEROIC), Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, South Carolina

    Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy & Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
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  • Cassie C. Frazier
    Affiliations
    Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
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  • Gerard A. Silvestri
    Affiliations
    Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

    Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy & Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
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  • Alana M. Rojewski
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Alana M. Rojewski, PhD, Department of Public Health Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Cannon Street, MSC 835, Charleston SC 29425.
    Affiliations
    Department of Public Health Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

    Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina
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      On the basis of the results of the National Lung Screening Trial,
      • Aberle DR
      • Adams AM
      • et al.
      National Lung Screening Trial Research Team
      Reduced lung-cancer mortality with low-dose computed tomographic screening.
      the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends lung cancer screening with a low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) scan as a screening tool for early detection of lung cancer.
      • Preventive Services Task Force U.S.
      • Krist AH
      • Davidson KW
      • et al.
      Screening for lung cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.
      More specifically, this LDCT scan is recommended for high-risk individuals who have at least a 20-pack-year smoking history, who are currently smoking or have quit in the last 15 years, and who are aged 50–80 years.
      • Preventive Services Task Force U.S.
      • Krist AH
      • Davidson KW
      • et al.
      Screening for lung cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.
      At the time of writing this paper, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approved annual lung cancer screening as a covered benefit for those patients who meet the criteria outlined in the 2013 USPSTF recommendation (i.e., have 30-pack-year history and aged 55–77 years).
      • Moyer VA
      U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for lung cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.
      ,
      Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services
      Decision memo for screening for lung cancer with low dose computed tomography (LDCT) (CAG-00439N).
      CMS is expected to approve the new USPSTF guidelines in the future to offer coverage for additional individuals meeting the revised criteria. Nearly 8 million Americans met the 2013 eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening in 2018,

      Fedewa SA, Kazerooni EA, Studts JL, et al. State variation in low-dose CT scanning for lung cancer screening in the United States. J Natl Cancer Inst. In press. Online November 12, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djaa170.

      and an additional 6 million adults will be eligible under the new recommendations.

      Landy R, Young CD, Skarzynski M, et al. Using prediction-models to reduce persistent racial/ethnic disparities in draft 2020 USPSTF lung-cancer screening guidelines. J Natl Cancer Inst. In press. Online January 5, 2021. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djaa211.

      Importantly, if every eligible person took advantage of annual LDCT screening, >12,000 lung cancer deaths could be prevented each year.
      • Aberle DR
      • Adams AM
      • et al.
      National Lung Screening Trial Research Team
      Reduced lung-cancer mortality with low-dose computed tomographic screening.
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