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Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Clinical Trial Recruitment in the U.S.

  • Young-Rock Hong
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Young-Rock Hong, PhD, MPH, Department of Health Services Research, Management & Policy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, PO Box 100195, Gainesville FL 32610.
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Services Research, Management & Policy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

    UF Health Cancer Center, Gainesville, Florida
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  • Amir Alishahi Tabriz
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

    Department of Oncologic Sciences, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida
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  • Kea Turner
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

    Department of Oncologic Sciences, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida
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      Diversity in research participation is essential for ensuring that new interventions benefit all populations. In the U.S., the under-representation of Black and Hispanic Americans in clinical research has persisted over time and poses a significant obstacle to developing and implementing interventions to improve population health.
      • Loree JM
      • Anand S
      • Dasari A
      • et al.
      Disparity of race reporting and representation in clinical trials leading to cancer drug approvals from 2008 to 2018.
      ,
      • Chastain DB
      • Osae SP
      • Henao-Martínez AF
      • Franco-Paredes C
      • Chastain JS
      • Young HN.
      Racial disproportionality in COVID clinical trials.
      Given that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disproportionately burdens Black and Hispanic Americans, considerable attention has been given to the development of more inclusive clinical trials.
      • Chastain DB
      • Osae SP
      • Henao-Martínez AF
      • Franco-Paredes C
      • Chastain JS
      • Young HN.
      Racial disproportionality in COVID clinical trials.
      No national-level analysis of racial and ethnic differences in clinical trial recruitment, including invitation, participation, and motivation, has been performed. As new treatments are developed, such as the COVID-19 therapeutic interventions, it is timely to assess the status of racial and ethnic disparities in clinical trials in the U.S. using newly available data, which could inform recruitment strategies moving forward. Therefore, this study examines the national prevalence of clinical trial invitation, participation, and motivation by race and ethnicity.
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