Advertisement

The Association Between Neighborhood Public Transportation Usage and Youth Physical Activity

  • Isa Granados
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Isa Granados, MS, Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, 215 Morris Street, Durham NC 27701.
    Affiliations
    Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
    Search for articles by this author
  • Elizabeth L. Haderer
    Affiliations
    Department of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
    Search for articles by this author
  • Cody D. Neshteruk
    Affiliations
    Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
    Search for articles by this author
  • Sarah C. Armstrong
    Affiliations
    Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina

    Duke Family Medicine & Community Health, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina

    Duke Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina

    Duke Global Health Institute, Durham, North Carolina

    Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina
    Search for articles by this author
  • Asheley C. Skinner
    Affiliations
    Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina

    Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina
    Search for articles by this author
  • Emily M. D'Agostino
    Affiliations
    Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina

    Duke Family Medicine & Community Health, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina

    Duke Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Occupational Therapy, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
    Search for articles by this author

      Introduction

      Routine adolescent physical activity is a well-established predictor of positive health across the lifespan, although wide disparities in youth physical activity engagement persist across sex and race/ethnicity. Transportation barriers may be related to adolescents’ ability to access physical activity opportunities. This study examines the association between neighborhood public transportation usage and adolescent physical activity using a national sample.

      Methods

      Cross-sectional data were drawn from the Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating study (2014), a national sample of adolescents aged 12–17 years. Linear regression examined the association between neighborhood public transportation usage on the basis of neighborhood-level public transportation use and individual-level youth moderate-to-vigorous physical activity minutes per week. Models were developed for weekday, weekend, and combined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for all youth and across sex and race/ethnicity subgroups. Analyses were run in 2020.

      Results

      The final analytic data set included 1,247 adolescents aged 12–17 years (71% non-Hispanic White, 49% male, mean age=14.52 [SD=1.59] years). Adjusted models showed a stronger magnitude of association between high neighborhood public transportation usage and both weekday (β=8.79, 95% CI=1.00, 16.59) and combined (β=13.74, 95% CI=1.14, 26.35) moderate-to-vigorous physical activity than between low/moderate neighborhood public transportation usage and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The magnitude of the neighborhood public transportation usage–moderate-to-vigorous physical activity association was strongest among non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic adolescent girls.

      Conclusions

      This study found an association between neighborhood public transportation usage and adolescent moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, particularly among non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic adolescent girls. Findings from this research have the potential to inform targeted interventions for promoting adolescent physical activity to ultimately reduce chronic health disparities across the lifespan.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to American Journal of Preventive Medicine
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      REFERENCES

        • Lee IM
        • Shiroma EJ
        • Lobelo F
        • et al.
        Effect of physical inactivity on major non-communicable diseases worldwide: an analysis of burden of disease and life expectancy.
        Lancet. 2012; 380: 219-229https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61031-9
        • Strong WB
        • Malina RM
        • Blimkie CJ
        • et al.
        Evidence based physical activity for school-age youth.
        J Pediatr. 2005; 146: 732-737https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2005.01.055
        • Katzmarzyk PT
        • Denstel KD
        • Beals K
        • et al.
        Results from the United States 2018 report card on physical activity for children and youth.
        J Phys Act Health. 2018; 15: S422-S424https://doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2018-0476
        • Tudor-Locke C
        • Ainsworth BE
        • Adair LS
        • Popkin BM.
        Objective physical activity of Filipino youth stratified for commuting mode to school.
        Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003; 35: 465-471https://doi.org/10.1249/01.MSS.0000053701.30307.A6
        • Faulkner GE
        • Buliung RN
        • Flora PK
        • Fusco C.
        Active school transport, physical activity levels and body weight of children and youth: a systematic review.
        Prev Med. 2009; 48: 3-8https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.10.017
        • Gill M
        • Roth SE
        • Chan-Golston AM
        • et al.
        Evaluation of an intervention to increase physical activity in low-income, urban middle schools.
        J Sch Health. 2019; 89: 705-714https://doi.org/10.1111/josh.12808
        • McDonald NC.
        Critical factors for active transportation to school among low-income and minority students. Evidence from the 2001 National Household Travel Survey.
        Am J Prev Med. 2008; 34: 341-344https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2008.01.004
        • Chaix B
        • Kestens Y
        • Duncan S
        • et al.
        Active transportation and public transportation use to achieve physical activity recommendations? A combined GPS, accelerometer, and mobility survey study.
        Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014; 11: 124https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-014-0124-x
        • Frazier SL
        • Dinizulu SM
        • Rusch D
        • Boustani MM
        • Mehta TG
        • Reitz K.
        Building resilience after school for early adolescents in urban poverty: open trial of Leaders @ Play.
        Adm Policy Ment Health. 2015; 42: 723-736https://doi.org/10.1007/s10488-014-0608-7
        • Nebeling LC
        • Hennessy E
        • Oh AY
        • et al.
        The FLASHE Study: survey development, dyadic perspectives, and participant characteristics.
        Am J Prev Med. 2017; 52: 839-848https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2017.01.028
        • Saint-Maurice PF
        • Kim Y
        • Hibbing P
        • Oh AY
        • Perna FM
        • Welk GJ.
        Calibration and validation of the Youth Activity Profile: the FLASHE Study.
        Am J Prev Med. 2017; 52: 880-887https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2016.12.010
        • Nader PR
        • Bradley RH
        • Houts RM
        • McRitchie SL
        • O'Brien M
        Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity from ages 9 to 15 years [published correction appears in JAMA. 2009;301(20):2095–2098].
        JAMA. 2008; 300: 295-305https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.300.3.295
      1. Public use microdata samples (PUMS). United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/microdata.html. Updated February 23, 2021. Accessed August 27, 2020.

        • Gordon-Larsen P
        • Nelson MC
        • Page P
        • Popkin BM.
        Inequality in the built environment underlies key health disparities in physical activity and obesity.
        Pediatrics. 2006; 117: 417-424https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2005-0058
        • Eaton DK
        • Kann L
        • Kinchen S
        • et al.
        Youth risk behavior surveillance - United States, 2011.
        MMWR Surveill Summ. 2012; 61: 1-162
        https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22673000/
        Date accessed: August 20, 2020
        • Skinner AC
        • Ravanbakht SN
        • Skelton JA
        • Perrin EM
        • Armstrong SC.
        Prevalence of obesity and severe obesity in U.S. children, 1999-2016 [published correction appears in Pediatrics. 2018;142(3):e20181916].
        Pediatrics. 2018; 141e20173459https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-3459
        • Asabigi KN.
        New technologies and automakers have the potential to eliminate transportation as a major factor contributing to health disparities, and provide additional benefits.
        J Transp Technol. 2016; 6: 449-456https://doi.org/10.4236/jtts.2016.65036
        • Saelens BE
        • Sallis JF
        • Frank LD
        • et al.
        Obesogenic neighborhood environments, child and parent obesity: the Neighborhood Impact on Kids study.
        Am J Prev Med. 2012; 42: e57-e64https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2012.02.008
        • D'Agostino EM
        • Patel HH
        • Hansen E
        • Mathew MS
        • Messiah SE.
        Longitudinal effects of transportation vulnerability on the association between racial/ethnic segregation and youth cardiovascular health.
        J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2021; 8: 618-629https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-020-00821-8
        • Bezold CP
        • Stark JH
        • Rundle A
        • et al.
        Relationship between recreational resources in the school neighborhood and changes in fitness in New York City public school students.
        J Urban Health. 2017; 94: 20-29https://doi.org/10.1007/s11524-016-0114-1
        • Sallis JF
        • Cerin E
        • Conway TL
        • et al.
        Physical activity in relation to urban environments in 14 cities worldwide: a cross-sectional study [published correction appears in Lancet. 2016;387(10034):2198].
        Lancet. 2016; 387: 2207-2217https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)01284-2
      2. Adolescent health. Healthy People 2020, HHS, Office of Disease Prevention and Health promotion. https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/Adolescent-Health. Updated June 23, 2021. Accessed August 27, 2020.

      3. Moudon AV, Stewart O, Lin L. Safe routes to school (SRTS) statewide mobility assessment study: phase I report. Seattle, WA: Washington State, Department of Transportation, Office of Research & Library Services. https://www.wsdot.wa.gov/research/reports/fullreports/743.1.pdf. Published January 2010. Accessed August 27, 2020.

      Linked Article