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Variations in Healthcare Transition Preparation Among Youth With Chronic Conditions

  • Myriam Casseus
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Myriam Casseus, PhD, MPH, MA, Research Center, Children's Specialized Hospital, 200 Somerset Street, New Brunswick NJ 08901.
    Affiliations
    Research Center, Children's Specialized Hospital, New Brunswick, New Jersey
    Search for articles by this author
  • JenFu Cheng
    Affiliations
    Physiatry Section, Children's Specialized Hospital, Mountainside, New Jersey

    Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey

    Department of Pediatrics, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey
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Published:December 20, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2021.10.010

      Introduction

      Youth with special healthcare needs have low rates of healthcare transition services, which can affect lifelong functioning and quality of life. This study examines the variations in receipt of healthcare transition services among youth with special healthcare needs.

      Methods

      Data from the 2016–2018 National Survey of Children's Health (N=102,341) were analyzed in 2021. Receipt of healthcare transition services by youth with select health conditions was compared with youth with other special healthcare needs. Bivariate and multivariable analyses assessed the associations between the receipt of healthcare transition services, sociodemographic characteristics, and health conditions.

      Results

      Among youth with special healthcare needs, the prevalence of receiving healthcare transition services was lowest among youth with speech or other language disorders (8.5%), intellectual disabilities (9.4%), and autism spectrum disorder (11.1%). Low prevalence of receiving healthcare transition services was also observed for youth with developmental delays (12.6%), learning disabilities (14.2%), and behavior or conduct problems (15.5%). Youth with developmental delays (AOR=0.70, 95% CI=0.52, 0.95), intellectual disabilities (AOR=0.45, 95% CI=0.26, 0.78), learning disabilities (AOR=0.77, 95% CI=0.60, 0.99), autism spectrum disorder (AOR=0.60, 95% CI=0.41, 0.86), and speech or other language disorders (AOR=0.48, 95% CI=0.32, 0.72) had lower odds of receiving healthcare transition services than youth with other special healthcare needs.

      Conclusions

      Findings suggest that the receipt of healthcare transition services varies substantially by the type of chronic health condition and highlight the need for increased healthcare transition services for youth with special healthcare needs, especially for youth with neurodevelopmental disabilities and speech or other language disorders.
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