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Smoking Cessation Among U.S. Adult Smokers With and Without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 2018

  • Yong Liu
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Yong Liu, MD, Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway Northeast, MS S–107–6, Atlanta GA 30341.
    Affiliations
    Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Kurt J. Greenlund
    Affiliations
    Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Brenna VanFrank
    Affiliations
    Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Fang Xu
    Affiliations
    Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Hua Lu
    Affiliations
    Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Janet B. Croft
    Affiliations
    Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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Published:February 01, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2021.12.001

      Introduction

      More than 3 of 5 U.S. adults who have ever smoked cigarettes have quit. This study assesses the latest estimates of smoking cessation among U.S. adults with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who have ever smoked cigarettes (ever smokers).

      Methods

      Data from 161,233 ever smokers (12.8% with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) in the 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed in 2020. Weighted percentages of quit ratios (percentage of ever smokers who quit smoking), past-year quit attempts (≥1 day), and recent successful cessation (quit ≥6 months ago) by self-reported physician-diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease status were obtained from multivariable logistic regression analyses, with adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, health risk behaviors, depression, and asthma.

      Results

      Adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who smoked had greater age-adjusted past-year quit attempts (68.8% vs 64.3%) but lower recent successful cessation (4.5% vs 5.8%) and quit ratio (53.2% vs 63.9%) than those without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. After adjusting for covariates, adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who smoked had a significantly higher percentage of past-year quit attempts but similar recent successful cessation and a significantly lower lifetime quit ratio than their counterparts without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

      Conclusions

      These findings suggest that individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who try to quit smoking may be less likely to succeed than those without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Evidence-based treatments for smoking cessation remain an important component of a comprehensive approach to helping all adults to quit and are a particularly important element of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management and care.
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