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Author Response to “Letter to the Editor Regarding ‘Routine HIV Testing and Outcomes: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Taiwan’”

      We thank Sharma and Joshi
      • Sharma D
      • Joshi P.
      Letter to the editor regarding “Routine HIV testing and outcomes: a population-based cohort study in Taiwan.
      for their kind interest in our work. However, they seemed to have misunderstood the inclusion criteria in our study.
      • Chen YH
      • Fang CT
      • Shih MC
      • et al.
      Routine HIV testing and outcomes: a population-based cohort study in Taiwan.
      We are also puzzled by their criticism of the Taiwan national HIV case management system and universal health coverage, under which 92% of all diagnosed individuals were receiving antiretroviral therapy.
      • Chen YH
      • Fang CT
      • Shih MC
      • et al.
      Routine HIV testing and outcomes: a population-based cohort study in Taiwan.
      ,
      Taiwan Centers for Disease Control
      Ending the HIV epidemic by 2030 [in Chinese].
      More perplexingly, the subgroup analyses they request are already reported in the main results of our article (page 239, Table 3).
      • Chen YH
      • Fang CT
      • Shih MC
      • et al.
      Routine HIV testing and outcomes: a population-based cohort study in Taiwan.
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