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Cancer Screening Test Use―U.S., 2019

  • Susan A. Sabatino
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Susan A. Sabatino, MD, MPH, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, Mail Stop S107-4, Atlanta GA 30341.
    Affiliations
    Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Trevor D. Thompson
    Affiliations
    Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Mary C. White
    Affiliations
    Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Jean A. Shapiro
    Affiliations
    Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Author Footnotes
    ⁎ At completion of this work, Dr. Clarke's affiliation changed to the Office of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration.
    Tainya C. Clarke
    Footnotes
    ⁎ At completion of this work, Dr. Clarke's affiliation changed to the Office of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration.
    Affiliations
    Division of Health Interview Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Maryland
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  • Jennifer M. Croswell
    Affiliations
    Division of Cancer Control & Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Lisa C. Richardson
    Affiliations
    Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Author Footnotes
    ⁎ At completion of this work, Dr. Clarke's affiliation changed to the Office of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration.

      Introduction

      The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening to reduce mortality from these cancers, but screening use has been below national targets. The purpose of this study is to examine the proportion of screening-eligible adults who are up to date with these screenings and how screening use compares with Healthy People 2020 targets.

      Methods

      Data from the 2019 National Health Interview Survey were used to examine the percentages of adults up to date with breast cancer screening among women aged 50‒74 years without previous breast cancer, cervical cancer screening among women aged 21‒65 years without previous cervical cancer or hysterectomy, and colorectal cancer screening among adults aged 50‒75 years without previous colorectal cancer. Estimates are presented by sociodemographic characteristics and healthcare access factors. Analyses were conducted in 2021.

      Results

      Percentages of adults up to date were 76.2% (95% CI= 75.0, 77.5) for breast cancer screening, 76.4% (95% CI= 75.2, 77.6) for cervical cancer screening, and 68.3% (95% CI= 67.3, 69.3) for colorectal cancer screening. Although some population subgroups met breast and colorectal cancer screening targets (81.1% and 70.5%, respectively), many did not, and cervical cancer screening was below the target for all examined subgroups. Lower education and income, nonmetropolitan county of residence (which included rural counties), no usual source of care or health insurance coverage, and Medicaid coverage were associated with lower screening test use.

      Conclusions

      Estimated use of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening tests based on the 2019 National Health Interview Survey were below national targets. Continued monitoring may allow for examination of screening trends, inform interventions, and track progress in eliminating disparities.
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