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Trends in Traumatic Brain Injury Related to Consumer Products Among U.S. School-aged Children Between 2000 and 2019

  • Tuan D. Le
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Tuan D. Le, MD, DrPH, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Community and Rural Health, The University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center, 11937, Highway 271, Tyler TX 75708.
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Community and Rural Health, The University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center, Tyler, Texas

    Research Directorate, U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA-Fort Sam Houston, Sam Houston, Texas
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  • Alan D. Cook
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Community and Rural Health, The University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center, Tyler, Texas

    Department of Surgery, The University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center and UT Health East Texas, Tyler, Texas

    The Center for Trauma Research, The University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center and UT Health East Texas, Tyler, Texas
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  • Tony T. Le
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Community and Rural Health, The University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center, Tyler, Texas

    School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • John W. Keyloun
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Georgetown University Medical School, Washington, District of Columbia
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  • Paul W. Detwiler
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, The University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center and UT Health East Texas, Tyler, Texas

    The Center for Trauma Research, The University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center and UT Health East Texas, Tyler, Texas
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  • Gerald R. Ledlow
    Affiliations
    Department of Healthcare Policy, Economics and Management, School of Community and Rural Health, The University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center, Tyler, Texas
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  • Anthony E. Pusateri
    Affiliations
    Naval Medical Research Unit – San Antonio, JBSA-Fort Sam Houston, Sam Houston, Texas
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  • Karan P. Singh
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Community and Rural Health, The University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center, Tyler, Texas
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      Introduction

      Consumer product‒related traumatic brain injury in children is common, but long-term trends have not been well characterized. Understanding the long-term trends in consumer product‒related traumatic brain injury may inform prevention efforts. The study objective is to examine the trends in consumer product‒related traumatic brain injury in school-aged children.

      Methods

      Data were extracted from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System–All Injury Program for initial emergency department visits for consumer product‒related traumatic brain injury (2000-2019) in school-aged children and analyzed in 2021.

      Results

      Approximately 6.2 million children presented to emergency department with consumer product‒related traumatic brain injury during 2000–2019. Consumer product‒related traumatic brain injury increased from 4.5% of overall consumer product‒emergency department visits in 2000 to 12.3% in 2019, and its incidence rate (cases per 100,000 population) was higher in males (681.2; 95% CI=611.2, 751.2) than in females (375.8; 95% CI=324.1, 427.6). The annual percentage change in consumer product‒related traumatic brain injury was 3.6% from 2000 to 2008, 13.3% from 2008 to 2012, and ‒2.0% through 2019. Average annual percentage change was higher in females (5.1%; 95% CI=3.4, 6.8) than in males (2.8%; 95% CI=1.6, 3.9). Consumer product‒related traumatic brain injury increased from 2000 to 2012 in females and then remained stable. In males, annual percentage change increased from 2008 to 2012 and then declined through 2019.

      Conclusions

      Traumatic brain injury incidence rate in school-aged children increased from 2000 to 2019, peaked in 2012, and then declined in males but not in females. Percentage increases were highest in females. Prevention strategies should continue, with a specific focus on reducing consumer product‒related traumatic brain injury in female children.
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