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A Response to the President's Call to Support Public Mental Health

  • Briana Mezuk
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Briana Mezuk, PhD, Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor MI 48109.
    Affiliations
    Eisenberg Family Depression Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health, Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Donovan Maust
    Affiliations
    Eisenberg Family Depression Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Kara Zivin
    Affiliations
    Eisenberg Family Depression Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Search for articles by this author
      In his 2022 State of the Union address, President Biden outlined an ambitious plan for supporting public mental health in the U.S., which he said faces an unprecedented mental health crisis.
      The White House
      President Biden's State of the Union address.
      To support that claim, he cited statistics showing that during the peak of the pandemic, nearly 40% of Americans experienced symptoms of anxiety and depression, whereas access to mental health treatment remains poor, particularly for African American and Latino individuals. He also cited emerging evidence of the harms of social media use on the mental health of adolescents and young adults, echoing recent comments from the Surgeon General.
      The White House
      FACT SHEET: President Biden to announce strategy to address our national mental health crisis, as part of unity agenda in his first state of the Union.
      Yet, just a few days before Biden's address, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report that stated that the overall rate of suicide in the U.S. declined in 2020, the second consecutive year of a decline in suicide deaths.
      • Ehlman DC
      • Yard E
      • Stone DM
      • Jones CM
      • Mack KA
      Changes in suicide rates - United States, 2019 and 2020.
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