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Obesity, Cancer, and Health Equity

  • Kirsten A. Nyrop
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Kirsten A. Nyrop, PhD, Division of Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 170 Manning Drive, Campus Box 7305, Chapel Hill NC 27599.
    Affiliations
    School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

    Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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  • Jacquelyne Gaddy
    Affiliations
    School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
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  • Marjory Charlot
    Affiliations
    School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

    Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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Published:January 05, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2022.10.024
      The causes of racial and ethnic disparities in cancer risk and outcomes in the U.S. are complex and multifaceted and require an appreciation of the importance of understanding and addressing social determinants of cancer in a health equity approach to disease prevention and control in the U.S.
      • Alcaraz KI
      • Wiedt TL
      • Daniels EC
      • Yabroff KR
      • Guerra CE
      • Wender RC.
      Understanding and addressing social determinants to advance cancer health equity in the United States: a blueprint for practice, research, and policy.
      This commentary pertains to 1 specific contributor to racial and ethnic health disparities―the link between obesity and cancer―which is a growing focus of oncology research and clinical care.
      • Ligibel JA
      • Wollins D.
      American Society of Clinical Oncology Obesity initiative: rationale, progress, and future directions.
      Thirteen cancers are associated with overweight (BMI≥25 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2): adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, breast, colon and rectum, gallbladder, kidneys, liver, meningioma, multiple myeloma, ovaries, pancreas, thyroid, upper stomach, and uterus.
      • Kyrgiou M
      • Kalliala I
      • Markozannes G
      • et al.
      Adiposity and cancer at major anatomical sites: umbrella review of the literature.
      ,
      • Research World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer
      Continuous update project expert report – body fatness and weight gain and the risk of cancer 2018.
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